Sanding not only feathers out chipped paint but also provides "tooth" for the next coat of paint. For glossy trim, use a sanding sponge rather than sandpaper. Sponges mold to the shape of the trim and last longer than paper. When applying latex over alkyd paint or when he is not sure of the original finish, Brian Doherty, a painter in Richmond, Virginia, follows the hand-sanding with liquid sandpaper to make sure the surface is completely deglossed to prevent incompatibility problems. "I've seen homes where latex was used on oil-painted trim, and the paint started to peel in less than a year," says Doherty.
In this July 30, 1981 photo, John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturday night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83. Marty Lederhandler, AP
In this July 30, 1981 photo, John Coleman, weather channel founder, right, and Frank Batten, publisher of the Norfolk, Va., Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star, and chairman and chief executive of Landmark Communications, Inc., are seen during a news conference in New York. John Coleman, the founder of The Weather Channel and longtime KUSI weatherman, died Saturday night, Jan. 20, 2018, at home in Las Vegas, said his wife Linda Coleman. He was 83. Marty Lederhandler, AP
Actress Margot Kidder poses for a portrait in 1985 in Los Angeles, Calif. Kidder, who starred as Lois Lane in the “Superman” film franchise of the late 1970s and early 1980s, has died. Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, Montana posted a notice on its website saying Kidder died Sunday, May 13, 2918, at her home there. She was 69. Harry Langdon, Getty Images
If you feel your home or office has lost its sparkle, maybe it’s time to get it back with a fresh coat of paint. New paint is a fast, simple way to give your property a facelift without breaking the bank or taking on a major overhaul. With new paint and finishes, it’s easy to change the look of your interior and exterior surroundings with a minimal amount of effort.

"We were very satisfied with Wildcat Painting. The process was easy and the painters did everything that we expected. They were very efficient and paid attention to details and were very neat. The painting crew was professional and worked hard. Our house looks great and we are very happy that we contracted with Wildcat Painting to paint our home." - Renee R.
A house painter is responsible for painting the interior or exterior walls of a home. As a house painter, you must take great care to ensure that you do not damage any existing furniture or flooring by placing protective covers over important items in the house. You may have repair duties as well, helping to fix small holes or blemishes prior to painting them with brushes or rollers. While experience is not always necessary, you should have a keen eye for detail and brush skills.
Words cannot express my gratitude. From the time I met Mr. Lee who gave me the quote for the painting project that I considered fair until the completion of my home being painted I had no worries. Special thanks to John the foreman and his crew. John was kind enough to explained all the work he was doing step by step. I always take note and feel at ease when I am in good hands. Thank you Mr. Lee
A fellow (actually lives in the same neighborhood) by the name of Wayne Hickey (843-655-0366) painted the ceilings and most of the walls of our house in February 2017. He got paint all over my light fixtures, all over my trim around the doors, and had visible lap marks everywhere on the walls. He came back and rectified some of the problems, but not all, as I have noticed as I have had time to look more carefully at the work he and his assistant did. His assistant had no idea (not a clue) how to roll paint on a wall or ceiling. Some places were not covered. He said he would pull nails for pictures and then re-insert the nails exactly where they were. This he did not do as he promised. He painted over the nails. His assistant had no idea how to use a paint roller. I have painted all my life, and would have done this work myself, but I just had a full knee replacement and the other knee is in bad shape. I just could not do the work. Wayne is a pleasant and congenial individual, but he can not cut in a ceiling or wall to my satisfaction - not even close. He should have a putty knife and wet cloth with him all the time to correct any paint that might get applied where it shouldn't. That is something I always did as a painter. I would not recommend Wayne to paint anybody's home.

Steve, not only did you come off with an edge regarding the article written for Angie's list but you came awfully close to being slanderous. The article was written if you will have read his bio by a very well established professional painter. The issue regarding the deposit was put in question by a responder. I have read your response in full as you suggested, and companies as large as yours are just as likely to use the tricks of the trade as the small guy as you suggest, if not more so. A large company has less oversight and workers get lazy with the boss not looking over their shoulder. I have had experience in this area, and thought that i was dealing with a very reputable company that had been recommended by a couple friends, my insurance company, and my adjuster who had dealt with the company. I had terrible problems with the company, who do full restorations and like your company paint in all areas. To finalize your statement that Established businesses do not cheat customers is completly false and is a very misleading statement. I am suprised that Angies list allowed you to post such an outragious comment. All you have to do is look in the Civil lawsuits section of the Established businesses that are being sued or are under investigation for fraud and cheating their customers!

My husband has been a professional painter over 30 years. He prides himself in his high level of work ethic and customer satisfaction. He stays up to date on techniques and finishes. He gives Very detail and accurate appraisals with contracts. At an alarming rate, as he starts to finish the last day or the day before, the client starts nit picking and being disrespectful towards his work when every day prior to that, they were very pleased, as he request ongoing satisfaction throughout the job. Then they don't to want pay remaining balance, bicker about final cost, or stop payment. He has a crew he has to pay whether the customer does or doesn't honor the contract as well as our own household expenses. Wasted time ,labor, money and effort lost. Now how do we fix this? Remind yourself and clients that a contract is based on honor.

As an owners rep and former estimator for a gc i do expect to pay a reasonable deposit say 10 percent and then weekly progress payments. I am asking the painter to book his time and to do the work on my schedule. Most painting companies are not huge operations they will pay their staff weekly. For most repaints i ask for one tinted primer coat and one finish coat for 100 percent coverage. New work gets one tinted primer and two finish coats for 100 percent coverage. The cost of the paint is not really that different for colors or finish. Brands like european fine paint and C2 are more expensive than Ben Moore and sometimes more difficult to roll based on their consistency. Some home depot brands are as expensive as the Ben Moore and of equal quality others aren't. Red paints are notorious for number of coats required and special priming requirements.
Great service all around, from the owner to the contractors who executed the project. All very attentive to the needs of the project, planning, adjustments needed, and trouble shooting. Extremely responsive in communication, via, phone, text, and email. They worked fast, and neat. Very detailed. And I am very picky and detail oriented to start. They worked to answer any questions, or concerns that I had throughout the process. I trusted them to work in my house while I was not home. Extremely trust worthy. I had them paint my entire house, paint and replace all floor and door trim, and also painted and installed all new interior doors. I plan on using them in the future to refinish my deck, and paint my kitchen cabinets. I highly recommend them.
Pay by Experience for a House Painter has a positive trend. An entry-level House Painter with less than 5 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $31,000 based on 97 salaries provided by anonymous users. Average total compensation includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay. A House Painter with mid-career experience which includes employees with 5 to 10 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $31,000 based on 86 salaries. An experienced House Painter which includes employees with 10 to 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $36,000 based on 136 salaries. A House Painter with late-career experience which includes employees with greater than 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $41,000 based on 124 salaries.

The Painting Company of Birmingham has been in business since 2007, we are based in Birmingham, AL. We specialize in residential painting and commercial painting, both interior and exterior. We are the top residential painting company in Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan area. We are proud of setting the standard for all other painting companies to strive for. If you live in the Greater Birmingham area, we would love to give you an estimate!
Payment. Every client is different. Every job has it's own unique set of circumstances. I always start off the discussion with my clients saying that I'm flexible on how they would like to proceed with payments but that I prefer half down. I refuse to change order. Change orders are my last resort. Instead I ask questions at our initial meeting and try to be sure to cover all bases before I submit my estimate.
I managed commercial construction projects for many years, have built and remodeled several properties, and never once have I encountered any of these scams. The tone of this article is deeply troubling. The author seems to be saying that ALL painting contractors are inherently dishonest, and that has not been my experience. The underlying advice here is sound: get it all in writing and cover as many contingencies as possible--so pointing out potential pitfalls like coat coverage is helpful. But do that in the spirit of clear communication of expectations, not with the expectation that the person you are hiring will try to cheat you at every turn. Not every contractor takes outrageous advantage of change orders; not every contractor will sneak past necessary preparation and/or repairs. Contractors of all sorts get a bad rap as it is; reinforcing a stereotype with articles written from this point of view just seems unproductive.
This is the memoir of a professional painter (think houses, not canvas) from Montana who desperately wants to be something else. Or does he? Burbidge rolls out the long, sometimes painful, but always interesting journey he underwent for 15 years, and his eventual break with that fascinating subculture, all the while retaining his painter’s soul. The book, as you might assume, is not really about painting. It’s about the people who apply the paint. It’s also about their lives, loves, hates, prejudices, addictions, and phobias. Burbidge describes them as “Dressed in white as they craft a backdrop to civilization, painters invite invisibility, smarting from the stigma of a simpleton occupation.” The author’s masterful descriptions, dialogue and characterizations serve as an ideal base coat for these entertaining stories in which humor is often found even amid the soul-deadening weight of the daily grind. Burbidge hints at an undeniable pride in being a professional painter. And for good reason, as he says in his introduction: “First fact about paint: it’s only one-thousandth of an inch thick when dry. But that one-thousandth of an inch protects and colorizes most of what humans construct on this planet, so what it lacks in depth it recovers in width, despite going largely unnoticed except by the people who put it there. The painters.” The next time I visit a supermarket or cross a bridge, I will try to remember that someone had to go up there, brush, roller, or sprayer in hand, and do the job that most of us take for granted. I’ll think about what that person looks like, if he has kids, a college degree, a gambling addiction, a penchant for practical jokes, or a chip on her shoulder about how the public perceives her choice of occupation. And if you read this powerful and entertaining collection, I bet you will, too.

In this Aug. 19, 2005, file photo, Seattle Storm coach Anne Donovan, right, smiles as she is handed the game ball by team official Karen Bryant following the Storm's victory over the Minnesota Lyn in Seattle. The victory gave Donovan her 100th career WNBA victory as a coach, the first woman to reach that plateau. Donovan died on June 13, 2018, of heart failure. She was 56. Donovan's family confirmed the death in a statement. Elaine Thompson, AP


Every home has details that can be accentuated for amazing looking visual appeal and first impressions.  The key is to not make the wrong details stand out.  Entryways, windows, shutters and other details on the home can be painted to make their design noticeable.  However features such as gutters, downspouts, external air conditioning systems, unevenly proportioned windows and protruding garage doors should not be completed to draw attention to them as this will provide a negative results.
×